Short Story Writing Month, and here I am working on one of my novels.

Well, this is silly.

Last year, Short Story Writing Month gave me a kick in the pants to start writing short stories.  It was a welcomed change from writing novels.  It put some distance between me and them, and, quite fortunately, garnered me a couple of credits for my CV.

And now that’s SSWM is here again, I feel somewhat silly that, suddenly, I’ve stopped writing short stories to tinker with my novels again.

Now that I’ve got a couple of things in print, I feel I have a better position when approaching an agent to represent the Spell Carrier series.  I hope this is the case; I’d love to see these books get picked up.

I reread the first book last month, and was delighted/excited/relieved to discover that I really, really enjoyed it.  It’s been a few years for that one, and, having distanced myself from ‘the work’, it actually held up to my critical eye.

…Except the opening few pages, which I was never happy with.  So I rewrote them from scratch, and now I have my best foot forward.  I know where the story gets its hooks into *me*, I hope it snags my other readers the same way.  I know if they give it a shot, they’ll be hooked.  I know I was.

And that, my friends, is just about the best feeling I’ve ever had as a writer.

Thanks for reading.

Heidi out.

Let’s play “Who’s the Editor”

In submitting short stories pretty non-stop since June, I’ve discovered a strange phenomenon in the publishing world.

I don’t know who’s going to be reading my submission.

It goes something like this:

I click a duotrope listing I wish to investigate.  I read the duotrope entry, then go to the actual publisher’s webpage.  I find the specific project I’ll be submitting to.  I’ll read the submission guidelines.  Then, if I want to submit, I’ll start looking into the publisher and who I should be addressing my submission to.

In most cases, I have to dig, dig, to find out who’s name to address my submission to.  Then the possibilities look like this:

“Dear Editor” seems so lazy and impersonal, but I’ve had to use it on several occasions.

Closer than that is “Dear Guy1/Guy2” because in their “About” or “Bio” section they have two (or more) fiction editors, and I’m not sure which is handling the project I’m submitting to.  Only slightly better than “Dear Editor”.

Usually googling “who is editing anthologyXYZ” or similar phrases only brings me back to the publisher’s site, because there’s nothing about the anthology yet.   I also spend quite a bit of time on Absolute Write to try and narrow down names.

So what gives?  Why is it so hard to find out who the editor is?  Am I just supposed to know, and if I do I get sent to the front of the cue?

Many publishers do not have this problem; they have nice bio pages, with a paragraph or two about their editors, and I can take a better guess at who will want to see my submission.  Or they will state “Anthology XYZ, edited by SupercoolGal” or something similar.

My current plan is to document how many steps I have to take to find a name. I’ll post about this again when I have, say, ten submissions to use the data from.  …it’ll be maybe two months.  🙂

Anyone else run into this problem?  Am I missing something?